Skip to content

Reading recommendations: Animation on the web and vestibular disorders

It’s 7:25 a.m. and I’ve already learned so much. Actually, I just wanted to write a few paragraphs for an article about accessibility in CSS before I go to work, but I got caught up reading about animation on the web and vestibular disorders.

Here’s what I didn’t know about list-style-type

At the CSS-in-Vienna meet-up last week Ulrich told me that starting with Chrome 79 it's possible to define a string value for the list-style-type property. I was surprised because I thought ::marker was supposed to solve that. That's why I did some research, here’s what I learned.

Here’s what I didn’t know about…

Recently, it feels like I see a property, a property value or a selector I haven’t heard about pop up every day. Often these things I learn aren’t even that new, which makes me wonder how much I don’t know about CSS.

CSS pro tip for mac users: always show scroll bars in macOS.

I built a quite complicated component in HTML and CSS last week and I was happy with the result. After testing in different browsers and operating systems, I realised that I had to rewrite the whole thing because I didn’t consider that by default scroll bars don’t take up space on macOS, but on Windows they do. I tweeted about a similar issue about a year ago, but it seems that I didn’t take my own advice, so here’s a reminder for you and me.

matuzo.at from scratch #1 - Designing and finding inspiration

The this video I explain how I approach design and how I find inspiration, both online and offline. Subscribe to the YouTube channel.

Bad accessibility equals bad quality

When I talk about web accessibility at meet-ups and conferences, it’s safe to assume that at least one person will ask me something like “Yeah, accessibility sounds nice, but how many people are actually disabled? How many of my users are blind? And why would a blind person visit my website?”